1. An upgrade is pending. The site is only accessible in debug mode.
    Complete Upgrade
  2. Stop being a LURKER - join our dealer community and get involved. Sign up and start a conversation.
    Dismiss Notice

TAKE POLL Sales Reps & their personal FB

Discussion in 'Online Marketing & Best Practices' started by JoePistell, Jun 4, 2015.

This forum sponsored by...
?

Do you have any sales reps that are actively 'working' their personal FB account? If so, how many?

  1. 0

    3 vote(s)
    16.7%
  2. 1-2

    10 vote(s)
    55.6%
  3. 3-5

    3 vote(s)
    16.7%
  4. 6-10

    1 vote(s)
    5.6%
  5. 10-20

    1 vote(s)
    5.6%
  6. 21+

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  7. I Don't Know

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  1. higherturnover

    higherturnover
    Expand Collapse
    Noob

    First Name:
    Jake
    Dealer or Company Name:
    Higher Turnover Websites
    Twitter Handle:
    HigherTurnover
    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2011
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Shelburne, VT 05482
    Absolutely. I often point this out to the GM/owner. Not only does it help the retention rate by empowering the reps, but it actually DRAWS the better reps TO that store because they're given an extra set of tools that often, their previous dealership wanted no part of.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  2. This forum sponsored by...
  3. renee.stuart

    renee.stuart
    Expand Collapse
    Noob

    First Name:
    Renee
    Dealer or Company Name:
    Reputation Revenue
    Twitter Handle:
    @SayMyName2
    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2011
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    10
    Location:
    OR
    Hey @Jeff Kershner@Jeff Kershner

    I see a ton of it ... and it's not just happening on Facebook.

    Yes - many sales and service pros are leveraging their personal contacts (friends & family) using their personal Facebook profile, while others are are going all-in by creating a professional Facebook page (yes - these are the pros who are willing to pay to play). For those who don't want to compete with cute pigmy goat videos, Kardashian drama and politcal rants ... well, these pros are using Instagram, LinkedIn, YouTube and some are managing their own websites ... with bread crumbs leading back to the dealership they work for. These pros get it - they understand the monetary advantage to co-brand with their dealer.

    The superstars on my radar are not "pushing" product ... they are "sharing" information about who they are, what they do and where they work. They are solving their customers problems. They are committed to the process, and show up (each day) prepared to interact. They have a strategy - a powerful plan of action; one that they are bought into and one that delivers results.

    *ps: great thread - thanks for the nudge @JessicaRuth@JessicaRuth
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. renee.stuart

    renee.stuart
    Expand Collapse
    Noob

    First Name:
    Renee
    Dealer or Company Name:
    Reputation Revenue
    Twitter Handle:
    @SayMyName2
    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2011
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    10
    Location:
    OR
    In response to your question regarding "socially savvy reps" @JamieS@JamieS ...

    When implementing a personal brand strategy, the best practices is to use the only (2) two brand assets you have ... that when combined ... can NOT be duplicated -- Those assets are your face and your name. Use them together at all times.
    • When creating your online profile, do not use nicknames, initials or an OEM brand in the name field. Calling yourself “Susie 10x” or “Steve Car Guy” sounds gimmicky. This is a worn out tactic that will not differentiate you. The people who need to know you, want to know your real first and last name.

    • When choosing your online profile photo, do not use faceless avatars, logos, buildings, cars or full body shots. No one has your face but You - so use it! Your headshot is an important element of your online personal brand. It allows people to connect a face with a virtual identity. Having a few different headshots will help people get to know different sides of your personality and make your results more interesting when someone performs a Google Image search on you.
    Consumers are searching ... they are searching for professional evidence ... they are searching for subject matter experts ... they are searching for proof that You are a real person -- when your brand shows up consistently in search results, it makes it very easy for your customers to identify You (and your employees).

    Cheers to you and your teams success with social selling!

    If you want to share a fun exercise with your team, have them do this: Online ID Calculator
     
  5. Chandra Dickson

    Chandra Dickson
    Expand Collapse
    Noob

    First Name:
    Chandra
    Dealer or Company Name:
    Mercedes-Benz of Hagerstown
    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2015
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Hagerstown, MD
    I have a personal account as well as a business page, but find that when I post about my business, I don't get a lot of interaction.

    What does everyone else do? Separate individual account?
     
  6. Jeff Kershner

    Jeff Kershner
    Expand Collapse
    Founder

    First Name:
    Jeff
    Dealer or Company Name:
    DealerRefresh & Mercedes-Benz of Hagerstown
    Joined:
    May 1, 2005
    Messages:
    3,100
    Likes Received:
    750
    Location:
    Maryland
    @Chandra Dickson@Chandra Dickson that's really a great question. Personal Profile AND a Professional Personal Profile. Some might argue and recommend a Business Page. There are some nice advantages in having a Business Page - unlimited friend count (versus 5,000 for a personal profile), the ability to advertise your page, and access to Facebook Insights, which can provide you some valuable data. But the problem with a Business page anymore is that it's 90% Pay to Play. Unless you're going to spend your own money advertising your Business page, I don't see this being such a great option.

    I'm no facebook wizard so maybe someone will chime in and back me up on this...

    fb_lists.jpg

    Facebook does now offer the ability to create "Lists". You could create a list and title it "Business Friends" or something like that. I have a list titled "AutoIndustry Friends". When you post to your wall/feed you will have the option to select what list of friends you want to see that particular post. Or you could work it on the opposite and build a list for "Family & Friends" and keep everyone else as a default friend.

    Screen Shot 2015-12-23 at 3.00.55 AM.png

    From an efficiency standpoint, utilizing lists seems like the best answer for you. If it's NOT, PLEASE... someone jump in and offer some more sound advise.
     
  7. JamieS

    JamieS
    Expand Collapse
    Refresher

    First Name:
    Jamie
    Dealer or Company Name:
    FFC
    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2011
    Messages:
    125
    Likes Received:
    39
    Location:
    Florida
    Let me tell you, our staff that is heavy on Instagram does exactly this, and they get great interaction with names like AlexCarFinance or BillCarDeal. The setup and activity goes against everything we've ever read or been told about how to use social media, and it works, they gain tremendous followership and do business consistently. Some do not even work traffic from the lead pool, choosing instead to spend time on Instagram, and for lack of a better word, hock themselves to the public. They're not on the bottom of the sales board either. It's a head-scratcher, maybe it's the highly social market of South Florida, I don't know. When they're gaining 10k followers or more and selling, it's hard to argue.
     
  8. renee.stuart

    renee.stuart
    Expand Collapse
    Noob

    First Name:
    Renee
    Dealer or Company Name:
    Reputation Revenue
    Twitter Handle:
    @SayMyName2
    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2011
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    10
    Location:
    OR
    This is great news @JamieS@JamieS - Congratulations on your teams success.

    Those who are having the most success in social selling are providing great content. Publishing great content appears to be the common thread and the measurable KPI tied to the users professional success ... it has nothing to do with the nickname they're using.

    Any professional looking to build a strong, recognizable and long-lasting personal brand, should always use their first and last name in their profile. Your face & your name ... combined ... can not be duplicated. It "IS" the first and easiest step to differentiation yourself in a very crowded market place. It is a powerful tool to build your professional reputation.

    "Remember, that a person's name is to that person the sweetest and most important sound in any language" ~ Dale Carnegie

    In my community, people call me the "Lexus Lady" ... a nickname that I've grown fond of. They come looking for me, because they trust me. They find me because they know my name; they Google Renee Stuart ... not "the Lexus Lady". They recognize my face in the search results ... and can be confident that when they reach out (call, email or text) they know they've found the Renee Stuart they're looking for!

    Take Mike Correra for example. He uses his name and a consistent avatar in all of his online profiles. He also uses the nickname Mike the Car Guy as his "social handle." People in his community sometimes refer to him by his handle: Mike the Car Guy. Buyers have walked into the dealership and have asked for Mike the Car Guy - BUT, they also know his name and his face. When he steps out to shake their hand they instantly recognize him. There's no question that they've found Mike Correra - the person who they believe is going to help them with their vehicle needs.

    If your team is using nicknames as their "social handle" that's fantastic, considering "handles" typically represent the company, product or industry the professional is associated with.

    But if they are using a nickname as their profile name, they're making it harder for the people who need to know them ... to find them. Online social platform optimize the name field for search -- so given the only two assets a personal brand has (when combined) that can not be duplicated ... the best practice is to use them together - at all times. Use nicknames (handles) to enhance your profile, BUT not to define your brand.

    If your team is creating content as part of their personal brand strategy with the goal of becoming a subject matter expert, I highly recommend that they use their full name and a recognizable image of their face. It a pretty awesome feeling when a buyer stops by the store and asked for one of your team members by name ... it establishes instant rapport ... and in my book that's called a win, win, win.

    My 2 cents ... I hope you find it helpful.
     

    Attached Files:

  9. CraneAutoHR

    CraneAutoHR
    Expand Collapse
    Noob

    First Name:
    Candice
    Twitter Handle:
    CraneAutoHR
    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2015
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Atlanta, GA
    I struggle with endorsing personal branding. I have a strong fundamental belief that people want to grow. Engagement is positively correlated to empowerment, accountability, and complexity. Becoming proficient in sales and earning the business of your customers provides a unique high. Reaping the financial rewards of that success makes it even more attractive. However, at some point the effort and sacrifice required outweighs the benefit. The long hours are difficult to sustain. The challenge that used to excite becomes monotonous and frustrating. Even the most highly engaged employees will begin to disengage at some point.

    When this happens one of two decisions is made by the employee. They either identify another role they believe will bring the engagement back OR they find another store that has an environment or total rewards program more attractive then their current situation.

    In either scenario the employee moves on from sales. The fact is automotive retail has notoriously high turnover in sales. Only 33% of sales reps will reach their 3 year anniversary. The number continues to diminish in years 4 and 5, just when their customers are coming back to buy another car. So where does this leave the customer? If they connected with the sales person but not the dealership they will most likely follow that person to the next store. If they are a loyal brand enthusiast they will return to the original store with a little more distrust. They have probably worked with multiple sales reps and have learned to not fall in love with anyone because they won't be there when they return. If they fall into the last category of 'I have no brand or dealership loyalty, I just want a good deal', they probably have done 90% of their research online and will buy based on price and convenience.

    As a human capital strategist, I am all about improving the customer experience by strengthening core values, total rewards and opportunity for every employee. I would rather take the longer road to success if it means addressing (and correcting) the bigger problem. I believe it is the Dealers responsibility to generate traffic by making appropriate investments in technology, marketing, pricing and inventory. The employees are responsible for creating an exceptional customer experience. This takes a team effort. Everyone from the lot tech to the General Manager should be focused on improving process to put the customer in control. Executing this consistently will improve customer retention and strengthen the brand. More importantly it will drive more traffic.

    Rather than having the sales reps build a personal brand for a position they most likely will not be in in 5 years, I'd rather see the Dealer take responsibly for reducing turnover and create an environment that promotes growth and development. Happy employees will create happy customers and double the number of advocates you have for the business.

    Encouraging personal branding, in my opinion, reinforces to the employees that they operate in a silo. It takes branding ownership and control away from the dealer, and worst case scenario causes the dealer to lose an entire book of business if their top sales reps jumps ship to the competitor.

    I would prefer to see an investment made by the dealer to the employees career development and growth. Similarly the employee should be investing in their employer by owning the customer experience for all customers, not just theirs. (Obviously I'm a proponent of small teams but that's for a later discussion).
     
  10. emiltsch

    emiltsch
    Expand Collapse
    Administrator

    First Name:
    Eric
    Dealer or Company Name:
    Co-Founder: DealerTeamwork LLC & Co-Founder: Auto Outlets USA
    Twitter Handle:
    emiltsch
    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2009
    Messages:
    79
    Likes Received:
    20
    Location:
    Rochester, NY
    Thank you @Jeff Kershner@Jeff Kershner - lists are must have. Use them for organizing your segments and for your distribution. My automotive friends on Facebook get added to the Automotive list. My "regular" friends don't need to see everything and vice versa.
     
  11. emiltsch

    emiltsch
    Expand Collapse
    Administrator

    First Name:
    Eric
    Dealer or Company Name:
    Co-Founder: DealerTeamwork LLC & Co-Founder: Auto Outlets USA
    Twitter Handle:
    emiltsch
    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2009
    Messages:
    79
    Likes Received:
    20
    Location:
    Rochester, NY
    @CraneAutoHR@CraneAutoHR - This is a great view and one more dealers should embrace. The personal branding efforts happening today are the simplest way for a hustler to stand out and tell a different story. The clever ones see it as a way to position themselves within the industry for the eventual and inevitable jump to another dealership or to a vendor.
     

Share This Page

This forum sponsored by...