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Who are your mentors? Who are your heroes?

MikeHaeg

T.O.
Sep 15, 2011
60
15
First Name
Mike
Today’s post from Seth Godin is about mentors. The value of a mentor goes beyond tangible benefits like advice and introductions. Mentoring someone works well because of an obligation and responsibility to the mentor. It’s a unique case of The Hawthorne Effect.

He also cites a post from October 2010 that details the difference between mentors and heroes.

Mentors are personal and close to you.

Heroes are everywhere. They are public. The internet has created a whole new world of heroes.

Both are good. Both provide inspiration. Both should trigger action.

I ask you:


· Who are your mentors? What is your relationship like? How did you meet them? Do you have any stories of success because of a mentor?

· Are you a mentor to anyone? Do you realize your value? What role do you take in their professional development?

· Who are you heroes? How do you stay engaged with them? How have they inspired you?
 
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subi101

T.O.
Dec 13, 2011
60
43
First Name
Subi

I ask you:


· Who are your mentors? What is your relationship like? How did you meet them? Do you have any stories of success because of a mentor?

My "top billing" mentor in the industry is hands down Joe Webb. I am so incredibly blessed that he took an interest in showing me the ropes, giving me advice, and pushing me forward when I was afraid to take a step in my career. We met at Jim Ziegler's Battle plan in Atlantic City a few years ago. Stories of success? Oh, I don't know... My new job as Marketing Director, the DSES Digital Media Battle, my Digital Dealer session, blog writing... I owe all of that to Joe's mentorship.

· Are you a mentor to anyone? Do you realize your value? What role do you take in their professional development?
I have taken an interest in a few people over the years that have recently called me a mentor in the industry. This is a strange notion for me, because I feel that I am still learning myself, but I am more than willing to help anyone who asks. I think that motivating them, challenging them to think differently, being a sounding board, letting them vent, and pushing them when they fear something or doubt their abilities are basic responsibilities. I also feel a sense of responsibility to help others starting out that as others have done for me when I was starting out.

· Who are you heroes? How do you stay engaged with them? How have they inspired you?
I have been blessed that many of my heroes have become my personal friends. People like Joe Webb, Kevin Frye, AJ Maida, Amir Amirezvani, Renee Stuart, JD Rucker, and of course Jeff Kershner... are people that I've looked up to and followed for awhile. I'm proud to consider them friends of mine and learn from them daily. Each of them share a unique insight to their areas of expertise that challenges me to think differently.
 
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ddavis

Boss
Jun 28, 2011
1,493
492
First Name
Doug
Outside of my Grandfather, the man that influenced me the most was my Commanding Officer in Vietnam.

Col. J.J. McFadden had enlisted into the Army before WWII. He jumped on Normandy with the 101st Airborne and his unit took horrendous casualties. He was given a field commission to Major but was reduced in rank back to 2nd Lt. when the war was over. He served in Korea and had several tours in Vietnam. He never finished high school but passed the GED and went to college where he got a Masters degree. With his background he would never be a General but made it to full bird. In Vietnam, he was over an intelligence unit in Vietnam but also my detachment. He took a special interest in our unit. We were comprised of three teams of six and he spent a lot of time with us especially me and the other two team leaders. When we returned from the field, we were often invited to his personal quarters. He was constantly involved with us. I never heard him criticize one of us. He would ask us how we could have handled things better. If you screwed up, he didn't condemn us but he never allowed excuses. Often he said, "people that don't do anything don't make mistakes". He sent all of us to team leader school in Nha Trang, Vietnam. He pulled strings to get us in. At that school it was two students for every instructor but the nutrition rate was high and we ended up with one on one instruction. This was unlike any other school I attended in the military. The physical part was tough but there was no screaming or abuse. All of the instructors were out of Project Delta, Phoenix or Studies and Observation Group. These were the best that Special Forces produced and all had multiple tours. Many of these served with Robert Howard who I got the opportunity to meet as he visited the school. The Colonel knew these people and wanted us to have the exposure.

When I was discharged, he wrote a letter to the local newspaper. It was a very complementary letter about my service and my plans to finish college there. It was instrumental in me getting a job with the Veterans administration. I got a call from the Dean the same day.

The remaining members of the detachment just had a reunion Halloween week in the French Quarter. His name came up constantly during conversations. We all had a story about the Colonel. Staff Sergeants don't normally have much contact with full Colonels.
 
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Reactions: 3 people

john.quinn

Boss
Dec 2, 2009
1,006
640
First Name
John
Interpersonally, my father has been the biggest influence on my life; from him I get my work ethic and ethos regarding raising a family and being father.

Professionally, I very much existed on an island for a long, long time. If there is a term for bizarro-mentoring, insert it here: I learned quite a bit about how NOT to do things. While I don't recommend enduring the experience, skills were certainly developed.

Meeting Kershner while with MileOne was certainly a turning-point there, as it lead to being introduced to this community and eventually an introduction to Dealer.com. And I was just chatting with Alex the other day about how great it is now working with peers who actually "get it," where I'm not forced to do it all myself. I very much enjoy working with Alex and Uncle Joe and others who can intelligently challenge me and "up my game."
 
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Reactions: 2 people
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