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AdamMurray

Refresher
Sep 4, 2015
110
83
28
San Antonio, TX
First Name
Adam
The reason I think something is going to happen is that they've managed to piss off "the left".
"the left" control the bulk of the media and once you're not on their side, good luck.

To name a few key events that contribute:
  • The FTC is in talks about hundreds of millions in fines if they find what they think is there
  • Elon Musk removed all his corporate presences from Facebook
  • Playboy removed their presence
  • The View hosts said they will be deleting their Facebook accounts (believe me, they have an audience)
  • "the left" on Twitter exploded when they found out Facebook helps locate less than legal citizens for deportation / ICE
  • Mozilla created a plugin JUST to help combat Facebook, then pulled all their ads off Facebook
  • The founder of Whatsapp supported #deletefacebook (please note, Facebook owns Whatsapp)
  • Pep boys, Sonos and other national brands pulled their ads in a very public way
  • Celebrities like Cher, Will Ferrel, etc jumped ship in a very public way
I just don't see them bouncing back from this. Most companies (ie: Apple) bounce back from scandals by leveraging the media, but Facebook is running out of media companies who can help them out of this hole.
All great points. My only counterpoint being the leftist media (and all media for that matter) is purchasing the same exact data from the same companies as FB and touting contextual and behavioral hyper-targeting. Push the issue too hard and they're just shooting themselves in the foot (then they'll reignite the gun control debate!)
 
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Alexander Lau

Sr. Refresher
Feb 11, 2015
2,411
720
113
Mars, PA
First Name
Alex
One of my favorite topics to discuss these days...will be very interesting to see how the landscape changes in the coming months, if it changes at all. Personally, I don't feel like much is going to happen. Zucks will go in front of Congress, the morons with microphones will ask a bunch of outlandish questions looking for a quick sound bite and life will resume as normal. The small print in the announcement that FB will end its partnerships with Axciom, Experian, Oracle, etc. is over the next six months. That's a lot of time to let this all calm down and go back to business as usual.

Interesting that someone at NADA was talking about using Oracle Data in FB like it was something new. To the best of my knowledge, Oracle has been a data partner with FB since they acquired AddThis and Datalogix.
I think there are those in Congress who will want that pelt on their wall - so to speak. You walk on this and your opponent will beat you to pieces in the re-election.

:flame:
 
Oct 20, 2015
23
7
8
First Name
Abe
Facebook is going the way of the do-do bird, just give it 18 months.

https://www.theverge.com/2018/3/27/17167094/mozilla-firefox-facebook-container-tracker-blocker

Their profit model relies almost entirely on selling your data to companies for marketing purposes.
As traffic goes down (which it is for the first time in years) and people leave Facebook entirely, they're losing the leverage they have.


Facebook doesn't sell your data. In fact, it would be bad for their business if they did.

https://stratechery.com/2015/tim-co...trategy-credits-the-privacy-priority-problem/

  • First, it’s simply not true to say that Google or Facebook are selling off your data: what they are doing is promising advertisers they will display their ads to a particular type of customer as defined by the advertiser using Google or Facebook’s provided parameters. This may sound like semantics but the difference is significant: Google and Facebook do know a lot about individuals, but advertisers don’t know anything — that’s why Google and Facebook can charge a premium!


  • Second, Google and Facebook are highly motivated to protect user information. In fact, should Google or Facebook decide to sell your data, the value of each company would fall through the floor! Their competitive advantage in advertising is that they have data on customers that no one else has. In other words, if you consider incentives, Google and Facebook have more motivation to protect their users’ data from 3rd-parties than Apple does: money has a funny way of trumping morals (not that I question Apple’s! Rather, I’m just pointing out how wrong Cook’s implication is).
Don't forget who the biggest loser in Facebook's rise to power has been. The media has taken a beating. Where do their motives lie with all of these negative facebook stories?
 

craigh

Super Moderator
May 19, 2011
1,684
1,114
114
Ontario, Canada
First Name
Craig
Facebook doesn't sell your data. In fact, it would be bad for their business if they did.
Sorry. "Facebook makes money off your data" is more accurate.
They may not be selling the data directly (although, I don't necessarily believe that) but they are certainly profiting off my data by selling access to me to advertisers based on that data.

This story about them trying to get medical data is also questionable at best.
https://www.inquisitr.com/4856465/f...ta-from-hospitals-and-match-it-up-with-users/
 

Alexander Lau

Sr. Refresher
Feb 11, 2015
2,411
720
113
Mars, PA
First Name
Alex
https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018...onfirms-internet-traffic-metrics-are-bullshit

Yet not even Facebook, the world’s greatest data–gathering organization, seems able to produce genuine figures. In October, small advertisers filed suit against the social-media giant, accusing it of covering up, for a year, its significant overstatements of the time users spent watching videos on the platform (by 60 to 80 percent, Facebook says; by 150 to 900 percent, the plaintiffs say). According to an exhaustive list at MarketingLand, over the past two years Facebook has admitted to misreporting the reach of posts on Facebook Pages (in two different ways), the rate at which viewers complete ad videos, the average time spent reading its “Instant Articles,” the amount of referral traffic from Facebook to external websites, the number of views that videos received via Facebook’s mobile site, and the number of video views in Instant Articles.

Can we still trust the metrics? After the Inversion, what’s the point? Even when we put our faith in their accuracy, there’s something not quite real about them: My favorite statistic this year was Facebook’s claim that 75 million people watched at least a minute of Facebook Watch videos every day — though, as Facebook admitted, the 60 seconds in that one minute didn’t need to be watched consecutively. Real videos, real people, fake minutes. -NYMag
 
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John.H

Getting Refreshed
Nov 12, 2018
88
78
18
Chicago, Illinois
First Name
John
Here's the thing.

From my experience, Facebook marketplace is only successful with used car sales. I wouldn't recommend it being a primary source of leads. However, it can be a good way to diversify where you're producing sales from other places.

In my opinion, the more places you're advertising on, the better.
 

John.H

Getting Refreshed
Nov 12, 2018
88
78
18
Chicago, Illinois
First Name
John
https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018...onfirms-internet-traffic-metrics-are-bullshit

Yet not even Facebook, the world’s greatest data–gathering organization, seems able to produce genuine figures. In October, small advertisers filed suit against the social-media giant, accusing it of covering up, for a year, its significant overstatements of the time users spent watching videos on the platform (by 60 to 80 percent, Facebook says; by 150 to 900 percent, the plaintiffs say). According to an exhaustive list at MarketingLand, over the past two years Facebook has admitted to misreporting the reach of posts on Facebook Pages (in two different ways), the rate at which viewers complete ad videos, the average time spent reading its “Instant Articles,” the amount of referral traffic from Facebook to external websites, the number of views that videos received via Facebook’s mobile site, and the number of video views in Instant Articles.

Can we still trust the metrics? After the Inversion, what’s the point? Even when we put our faith in their accuracy, there’s something not quite real about them: My favorite statistic this year was Facebook’s claim that 75 million people watched at least a minute of Facebook Watch videos every day — though, as Facebook admitted, the 60 seconds in that one minute didn’t need to be watched consecutively. Real videos, real people, fake minutes. -NYMag
On the topic of metrics.. The only metric you should ever trust is /leads/appointments/sales produced from advertising...PERIOD.

Forget all the other metrics, such as view time, reach, quantity of link clicks, what have you. These are all ways some facebook "gurus" sell their prospects on their services.

Money talks, BS walks.

Which is why I recommend using advanced tracking when media buying on Facebook. Otherwise, you have nothing to use as a basis on performance.
 

Marc Lavoie

Refresher
Jan 3, 2019
178
123
43
Montreal, Canada
First Name
Marc
Works amazing BUT like any used car marketplace, if your cars are not at the right price, you will tank. No magic here.

The main challenge dealers are facing today is responding directly from Messenger. There are bots & companies out there that facilitate that portion so it's important you think about how you're going to manage it.

Most dealers are asking their people to leave Facebook not jump on it ;)

For the price, it's a no-brainer. The audience is obviously huge. The algorithm is also very effective in pushing you vehicles that might be of interest.

If anyone wants to chat about how & why to place your inventory on Facebook Marketplace, feel free to reach out.